Doctoral Students

The School’s PhD program provides research and educational opportunities for students to develop scholarly excellence in the study of human communication.

Click on the names below for an insight into the research topics, interests and background of current SASS doctoral students.

Supervisor:

Dr. Susan Small

Bio:

Sylvia obtained her Master’s degree in Audiology at the Western University and worked as a clinical and dispensing audiologist for 8 years before joining SASS PhD program..

Research Topic:

Speech discrimination in infancy

Research Interests:

Cortical auditory evoked potentials, speech evoked auditory brainstem responses,  speech discrimination and perception

Supervisor:

Dr. Tami Howe

Bio:

Katharine is a registered speech-language pathologist and PhD student in speech-language pathology. Before starting her PhD at the UBC SASS, Katharine completed a BA in International Relations, MA in Linguistics, and a MSc in Speech-Language Pathology.

Research Topic:

The met and unmet communication needs of individuals with primary progressive aphasia and their families: A stakeholder consensus

Research Interests:

Dementia-related communication disorders; Primary progressive aphasia and other language-led dementias; Knowledge translation; the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health; Rights-based approaches to communication disability

Supervisor:

Dr. Valter Ciocca

Bio:

Ilse is a PhD candidate at the School of Audiology and Speech Sciences at the University of British Columbia. Previously, she studied electronic engineering at the University of Pretoria, South Africa, where she also completed her Master’s degree in Bioengineering. For her Master’s degree, she investigated how cochlear implant users perceived the timbre (tone colour) of musical instruments.

Research Topic:

Ilse’s current research stems from an interest in understanding how listeners perceive characteristics of voice, and in particular how listeners perceive breathiness. Since the presence of noise in voice is a salient acoustic property of breathiness, she currently investigates how listeners perceive noise in tonal sounds. She also uses computer models of auditory processes to investigate which of these processes may help explain the perception of noise in tonal sounds.

Research Interests:

Perception of voice quality (breathiness); Voice synthesis; Fundamental auditory processes; Computer models of auditory processes; Bayesian statistics.